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World champion boxer says the new bisexual Superman is pushing an “agenda” on kids

Superman Jon Kent Bisexual
Photo: DC Comics

Claressa Shields, who is widely considered one of the greatest boxers of all time, recently went on a Twitter rant disparaging the news that the new Superman will come out as bisexual in DC Comics’ next issue of “Superman: Son of Kal-El.”

After the news broke last week, Shields, an Olympic gold medalist and three-division world champion, tweeted that she was “disappointed they would even do that” since Superman has always been in love with Lois Lane.

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When a follower responded explaining it was actually Superman’s son who would be coming out, Shields replied, “Lol oh. Don’t make it no better.”

This launched heated reactions from her followers, one of whom demanded she clarify her position, writing to Shields, “I didn’t take you as a homophobic person.”

Shields then claimed to not be homophobic while doubling down on her position.

“I’m no where near homophobic,” she wrote. “I just don’t think that cartoon characters should be bi sexual or gay. Leave the kids alone. Don’t push a agenda on children. To me that’s confusing kids. If a teenager or adult decides to be bi or gay, congrats to them. I have no problem with that.”

This ignited an even more fervent discussion among her followers, many of whom commented to defend the LGBTQ+ community.

“Queer person here to tell you that not having queer representation in my life as a kid really fucked me up for a long time,” one person wrote. “Representation is good. It saves lives. It doesn’t harm anybody.”

Many users also wrote that DC Comics isn’t pushing an agenda, but rather is being inclusive and teaching kids that all identities are valid. Others sarcastically suggested that based on Shields’s opinion, comics should also eliminate portrayals of heterosexual relationships.

“In that case cartoons shouldn’t be pushing heterosexual relationships either to make it fair,” one user wrote. “We don’t want to confuse young kids at all when they’re young, right? Or are you saying this only applies to bi-sexual and gay characters?”

While most comments appeared to criticize Shields, she had some defenders, too. Some merely agreed with her or else felt compelled to defend her right to free speech.

The controversy stems from DC Comics’ announcement last week that 17-year-old Jon Kent, the son of Clark Kent and Lois Lane will begin a romantic relationship with journalist Jay Nakamura.

According to an illustration released by DC Comics, the couple will even share their first kiss.

While Superman will not be the first LGBTQ superhero, he will certainly be the most well known. His status as one of the world’s most popular and recognizable heroes makes his coming out an even bigger deal.

“It’s not Hulkling. It’s not Wiccan. It’s not Fire and Ice. It’s not Tasmanian Devil,” writer Glen Weldon told the New York Times. “It is Superman. That counts for something — just in terms of visibility, just in terms of the fact that this is going to attract attention.”

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