Commentary

The overlooked Indiana outcomes that could haunt the Christian Right

Businesses across Indiana are participating in campaigns to let LGBT customers know they're welcome, but it might not be enough to completely heal the black eye the state received over its nationally-criticized religious objections law.
Businesses across Indiana are participating in campaigns to let LGBT customers know they’re welcome, but it might not be enough to completely heal the black eye the state received over its nationally-criticized religious objections law. Michael Conroy, AP

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Archbishop William Lori of Baltimore, who leads the religious liberty committee of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, said the bishops are undeterred

“Individual or family-owned businesses as well as religious institutions should have the freedom to serve others consistent with their faith,” Lori said in a statement.

What Lori meant of course, is that people who believe as he does should have the right to refuse service to people they do not approve of.

A second feature of the Indiana debacle, which we should not lose sight of, is that the Christian Right is losing the battle for the public perception that its views on religious freedom and LGBTQ people represent all of Christianity.

The Christian Right has never represented all of Christianity of course, and the Indiana episode provided us with an outstanding example.

Even before the sports organizations, businesses, and celebrities, one of the first national organizations to speak out against the Indiana RFRA was The Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), a mainline Protestant denomination with a half-million members, headquartered in Indianapolis.

The church’s denunciation of the bill was widely reported. Ultimately, the Disciples pulled their 2017 convention out of the state in protest over the law, the likely inadequacies of the then planned clarification, and the state’s lack of anti-discrimination protections for sexual orientation and sexual identity.

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“As a Christian church, we affirm and support religious freedom,” General Minister and President Sharon Watkins said in a prepared statement. “It is, in fact, a core principle…  We are also strongly committed to an inclusive community — just as Jesus welcomed all to the table.”

The Christian Right’s strategy has suffered some powerful losses of late. It is good to take notice.

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