Rob Portman’s political future now tied to his support for marriage equality

This family portrait provided by the office of U.S. Sen. Rob Portman shows, from left, his son, Will; wife, Jane; Sen. Portman; daughter, Sally, and son, Jed in Terrace Park, Ohio. Portman, who was on Mitt Romney's running mate short list in 2012 is considering his own 2016 presidential run. But such a plan could be complicated by the fallout from his newfound support for same-sex marriage when he learned his son Will is gay - the reversal upset some conservatives who oppose it. Courtesy Office of U.S. Sen. Rob Portman, AP

This family portrait provided by the office of U.S. Sen. Rob Portman shows, from left, his son, Will; wife, Jane; Sen. Portman; daughter, Sally, and son, Jed in Terrace Park, Ohio. Portman, who was on Mitt Romney's running mate short list in 2012 is considering his own 2016 presidential run. But such a plan could be complicated by the fallout from his newfound support for same-sex marriage when he learned his son Will is gay - the reversal upset some conservatives who oppose it.  Courtesy Office of U.S. Sen. Rob Portman, AP

This family portrait provided by the office of U.S. Sen. Rob Portman shows, from left, his son, Will; wife, Jane; Sen. Portman; daughter, Sally, and son, Jed in Terrace Park, Ohio. Portman, who was on Mitt Romney‘s running mate short list in 2012 is considering his own 2016 presidential run. But such a plan could be complicated by the fallout from his newfound support for same-sex marriage when he learned his son Will is gay – the reversal upset some conservatives who oppose it.

LEBANON, Ohio — For better or for worse, Ohio Sen. Rob Portman’s political future has become tied to same-sex marriage.

The Republican who was on Mitt Romney’s running mate short list two years ago is considering his own 2016 presidential run. But such a plan could be complicated by the fallout from Portman’s newfound support for same-sex marriage – the reversal upset some conservatives who oppose it. Some of them have pledged to oppose his next candidacy, too – whether for re-election to the Senate or for the presidency.

The dramatic change added a new dimension to Portman’s persona, often described as bland. It made him the first Republican senator to support gay marriage, a position that he said followed some family soul-searching. Portman’s then-college-aged son Will, had revealed to his parents that he is gay.

Add the personal decision to Portman’s resume – congressman, U.S. trade representative, White House budget chief and senator from electorally important Ohio – and what emerges is a unique potential candidacy in the wide-open field of GOP presidential hopefuls.

Portman says he gets questioned about his support for gay marriage a lot and is not hesitant about discussing it.

“Every week, sometimes every day, somebody will talk to me about it,” Portman said in a recent AP interview, wife Jane at his side.

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“I feel very comfortable in taking a position of respecting people for who they are,” he added, “which is what I think ultimately same-sex marriage is about.”

Nationally, it’s not clear whether Portman’s support for gay marriage would be an obstacle for his presidential ambitions.

A Gallup poll this year found support for legal recognition of same-sex marriages at a record high, with 55 percent in favor of it. Republicans remain broadly opposed, with just 30 percent favoring legal recognition for marriages between same-sex couples, but support has increased greatly over the last few decades. At the same time, Gallup’s data show that 78 percent of Americans under the age of 30 support legal gay marriages, suggesting that support will continue to grow.

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