Episcopalians will allow same-sex weddings in all churches without exception

The Rev. Cynthia Black, left, and the Rev. Bonnie Perry, right, hug after Episcopalians overwhelmingly voted to allow religious weddings for same-sex couples Wednesday, July 1, 2015, in Salt Lake City. The vote came in Salt Lake City at the Episcopal General Convention, just days after the U.S. Supreme Court legalized gay marriage nationwide.

The Rev. Cynthia Black, left, and the Rev. Bonnie Perry, right, hug after Episcopalians overwhelmingly voted to allow religious weddings for same-sex couples Wednesday, July 1, 2015, in Salt Lake City. The vote came in Salt Lake City at the Episcopal General Convention, just days after the U.S. Supreme Court legalized gay marriage nationwide. Rick Bowmer, AP

A resolution passed during the Episcopal General Convention on Friday, making it possible for same-sex couples to marry in their desired place of worship.

The triennial convening took place in Austin, Texas where support for the change in the church was overwhelming.

Before its passage, local authority had jurisdiction over whether or not to perform a same-sex marriage. Now, if the bishop objects to performing the marriage ceremony, they can tap another person to take over.

The Tennessean explained, “Under the resolution passed Friday, clergy still can decline to bless or solemnize any marriage. But if the couples live in a diocese where the bishop theologically objects to same-sex marriages, that bishop will tap, if necessary, another willing one to provide pastoral support to all involved.”

The group All Sacraments for All People have been pushing for this expanded resolution since 2015.

The group says that “93 bishops authorized trial use liturgies for marriage, granting sacramental inclusion to all; 8 bishops did not. These are the stories from one of the dioceses left behind: The Diocese of Tennessee.”

The resolution was initially broached during the 2015 General Convention. It was decided at that time that the decision on whether or not to perform the marriage was based on the eyes of each bishop directly.

The Episcopal Church’s website lists the national church’s position on LGBT persons in the Episcopal Church.

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