Alabama justices: Until U.S. Supreme Court rules, we’re in charge

Alabama Supreme Court justices (seated, from left) Tom Parker, Lyn Stuart, Chief Justice Roy Moore, Michael Bolin, Glenn Murdock; (standing, from left) Alisa Kelli Wise, James Allen Main, Greg Shaw, Tommy Bryan. JAY REEVES [ap]

Alabama Supreme Court justices (seated, from left) Tom Parker, Lyn Stuart, Chief Justice Roy Moore, Michael Bolin, Glenn Murdock; (standing, from left) Alisa Kelli Wise, James Allen Main, Greg Shaw, Tommy Bryan.

Alabama Supreme Court justices (seated, from left) Tom Parker, Lyn Stuart, Chief Justice Roy Moore, Michael Bolin, Glenn Murdock; (standing, from left) Alisa Kelli Wise, James Allen Main, Greg Shaw, Tommy Bryan.

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. — The Alabama Supreme Court has made itself an outlier in the judicial march legalizing same-sex marriages in the United States, drawing rebukes from gay rights advocates and evoking comparisons to Alabama’s defiance of federal authorities during the civil rights movement.

The court set up a showdown with a Mobile, Alabama, federal judge this week when it ordered officials in the state to stop issuing same-sex marriage licenses pending a U.S. Supreme Court decision later this year on whether gays and lesbians have a fundamental right to marry.

The Alabama ruling contradicts U.S. District Judge Callie “Ginny” Granade, who declared in January that Alabama’s constitutional ban on same-sex marriage violates the U.S. Constitution.

“Even as nationwide marriage equality is on the horizon, the Alabama Supreme Court is determined to be on the wrong side of history,” said Shannon Minter, legal director of the National Center for Lesbian Rights.

Alabama wasn’t the first state where a federal trial or appeals court declared same-sex marriages legal, but the state justices made Alabama the only state to push back in advance of the U.S. Supreme Court settling the matter.

The justices’ decision had quick results: By Wednesday afternoon, gay rights advocates said they could not find one of Alabama’s 67 counties where a same-sex couple could get a marriage license. Before the ruling, 48 counties had issued licenses in compliance with Granade’s earlier declarations.

The Alabama justices don’t dispute that the nation’s highest court will have the final say. But absent that ruling, the justices reasoned, they remain the ultimate authority on applying the U.S. Constitution to a state law. “State courts may interpret the U.S. Constitution independently from, and even contrary to, federal courts,” they wrote in a decision that described “traditional” marriage as “the fundamental unit of society.”

Minter, the attorney who represented gay couples who initially challenged Alabama’s ban, said the state justices showed “callous disregard” for their rights.

Dean Lanton said he and his partner, Randy Wells, had planned to wed in Birmingham on Aug. 12, the anniversary of their first date, but now might have to get married out of state because of the decision.

“It was a punch in the gut. It was out of the blue,” said Lanton, 54. “It’s just Alabama politics, deja vu from the 1960s.”

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