News (USA)

US monument status doesn’t guarantee Stonewall Inn’s future

Originally built as stables in the 1840s, adjoining buildings at 51 Christopher Street still have the brick-and-stucco facade that greeted bar-goers the night of the June 28, 1969, protests.

What began as a police raid escalated into days of street demonstrations that triggered an activist movement and prompted gay New Yorkers to stop hiding their identities and speak out publicly.

Patrons at the Stonewall are ecstatic the area will be recognized with a national monument. Jonathan Early called the Stonewall “the heart of the LGBT movement.” And as he passed by the bar last week, Jesse Furman said, “It really says something. It is a place of so much happiness and acceptance. Think about it. This is America’s landmark for the gay community.”

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