New York marriage equality law: welcoming to all, regardless of residency

LGBTQ Nation

From NYC.gov, office of the Mayor, comes these FAQ’s regarding New York state’s marriage equality law.

The Marriage Equality Act, which will make same-sex couples eligible to marry legally in New York, was passed and signed into law on June 24, 2011. The Act will go into effect 30 days after its signing.

New York City has always prided itself on its openness and diversity. We look forward to welcoming all couples who want to marry and celebrate their weddings amid our bright lights and legendary sights, including many landmarks of gay history. Whether you’re a native New Yorker or someone who yearns to be married in New York City, that opportunity is now yours — no matter whom you love.

Key information for all those interested in marrying here:

Who can get married in New York, now that the Marriage Equality Act has passed?

The Marriage Equality Act allows same-sex couples to get married in New York just like opposite-sex couples, with the same rights, responsibilities, and privileges under State and City law.

Can I get married in New York City even if I don’t live there?

Yes. Couples who reside in New York or in another state or country are all welcome to marry here.

When can same-sex couples begin marrying in New York?

The Marriage Equality Act allows same-sex couples to obtain marriage licenses starting 30 days after the Act was signed into law. State law generally requires couples to wait 24 hours after receiving a license before they can be married. Learn more at the City Clerk’s website. Learn more at the City Clerk’s website.

How do I get a marriage license in New York City?

To get a marriage license, apply for one from the New York City Clerk’s office. Once you obtain a license, it is valid for sixty days. Learn more at the City Clerk’s website.

Can my spouse and I get married in New York City if we were already married in another state or country?

Yes. You and your spouse can get married again in New York, whether you reside here or not. (Note: New York already recognizes lawful marriages, including same-sex marriages, that were performed elsewhere.)

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