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Blackhawks player Andrew Shaw apologizes for antigay slur

Chicago Blackhawks right wing Andrew Shaw, right, is hit by St. Louis Blues right wing Troy Brouwer during the second period in Game 4 of an NHL hockey first-round Stanley Cup playoff series Tuesday, April 19, 2016, in Chicago.

Chicago Blackhawks right wing Andrew Shaw, right, is hit by St. Louis Blues right wing Troy Brouwer during the second period in Game 4 of an NHL hockey first-round Stanley Cup playoff series Tuesday, April 19, 2016, in Chicago. AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh

CHICAGO — Blackhawks forward Andrew Shaw apologized Wednesday for yelling an anti-gay slur at someone on the ice after he was sent to the penalty box late in Chicago‘s Game 4 loss at home to the St. Louis Blues.

Speaking quietly for a few minutes before the team left for St. Louis, Shaw said he couldn’t sleep after Tuesday night’s game and watching video of his outburst was difficult. It was video of the incident that went viral on social media, prompting sharp criticism and an NHL investigation.

“It was hard to see. Emotions got the best of me,” Shaw said, adding that he understands why the slur is considered hurtful. “I’ll never use that word again, that’s for sure. … That’s not the type of guy I am.”

NHL spokesman John Dellapina said the league would have no comment until its investigation is completed.

Shaw was sent off for interference at 17:56 of the third period, hurting Chicago’s chance for a comeback in what ended up being a 4-3 loss. While sitting in the box, Shaw pounded on the glass with his stick and then yelled at someone on the ice. As video of the incident spread online, the You Can Play project swiftly tweeted that it was planning to contact the NHL.

After the game, Shaw was asked twice about what happened and said he didn’t remember.

“Being like I just said — I’ll repeat myself for you — emotions are high,” he said. “I don’t know what was said. Obviously, I was upset with the call. I wasn’t happy with the call.”

A day later, Shaw said he saw the video after he returned home from the arena and said he was “sincerely sorry for the insensitive remarks that I made.”

“I apologize to many people, including the gay and lesbian community, the Chicago Blackhawks organization, Blackhawks fans and anyone else I may have offended,” he said. “I know my words were hurtful and I will learn from my mistake.”

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