Alabama judges use segregation-era law to avoid gay marriage

In this Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2015, photo, a notification posted on a door outside of the probate office states "there will be no marriage licenses by Washington County probate office issued by an Alabama probate judge, Nick Williams, a judge that is using a segregation-era law to avoid gay marriage in Chatom, Ala. Williams, also a Baptist minister who serves as probate judge in Washington County, is among those who have stopped issuing any marriage licenses.

In this Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2015, photo, a notification posted on a door outside of the probate office states "there will be no marriage licenses by Washington County probate office issued by an Alabama probate judge, Nick Williams, a judge that is using a segregation-era law to avoid gay marriage in Chatom, Ala. Williams, also a Baptist minister who serves as probate judge in Washington County, is among those who have stopped issuing any marriage licenses. AP Photo/Brynn Anderson

In this Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2015, photo, a notification posted on a door outside of the probate office states "there will be no marriage licenses by Washington County probate office issued by an Alabama probate judge, Nick Williams, a judge that is using a segregation-era law to avoid gay marriage in Chatom, Ala. Williams, also a Baptist minister who serves as probate judge in Washington County, is among those who have stopped issuing any marriage licenses.  AP Photo/Brynn Anderson

In this Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2015, photo, a notification posted on a door outside of the probate office states “there will be no marriage licenses by Washington County probate office issued by an Alabama probate judge, Nick Williams, a judge that is using a segregation-era law to avoid gay marriage in Chatom, Ala. Williams, also a Baptist minister who serves as probate judge in Washington County, is among those who have stopped issuing any marriage licenses.

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — As Alabama’s all-white Legislature tried to preserve racial segregation and worried about the possibility of mixed-race marriages in 1961, lawmakers rewrote state law to make it optional for counties to issue marriage licenses.

Now, some judges who oppose same-sex marriage are using the long-forgotten amendment to get out of the marriage business altogether rather than risk issuing even one wedding license to gays or lesbians. In at least nine of Alabama’s 67 counties, judges have quit issuing any marriage licenses since the U.S. Supreme Court legalized same-sex unions in June.

While the precise reason that lawmakers gave for making the 1961 change has been lost to time, the 54-year-old provision says probate courts “may” issue rather than “shall” issue wedding licenses.

Nick Williams, a Baptist minister who also serves as probate judge in Washington County, is among those who have left the marriage license business. He says issuing a license for a same-sex union would violate his Christian beliefs.

“It is a religious freedom issue, but more than that I believe it is a constitutional issue,” said Williams, who last month cited the arrest of Kentucky county clerk Kim Davis in asking the Alabama Supreme Court to declare that officials don’t have to allow same-sex marriage if doing so violates their religious beliefs.

Like Davis, Williams said he would go to jail before he would approve a marriage license for a gay or lesbian.

Judges in three adjoining counties stopped issuing licenses for similar reasons, creating a region in southwestern Alabama where marriage licenses aren’t available for 78,000 people. As a result, Bo Keahey and fiance Hannah Detlefsen will have to spend nearly two hours on the road traveling to and from Monroe County before their November wedding because their native Clarke County has quit issuing licenses.

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