Nick Cearley on playing Puck, LGBT pride month, The Skivvies

Nick Cearley during a performance of "A Midsummer Night’s Dream," in New York.The actor-musician stars as the wise-guy sprite, Puck, in a more imaginative version of Shakespeare’s masterpiece that runs a little shorter, includes some razzle-dazzle, and adds music played by Cearley on ukulele and other instruments.

Nick Cearley during a performance of "A Midsummer Night’s Dream," in New York.The actor-musician stars as the wise-guy sprite, Puck, in a more imaginative version of Shakespeare’s masterpiece that runs a little shorter, includes some razzle-dazzle, and adds music played by Cearley on ukulele and other instruments. Russ Rowland/Joe Trentacosta PR via AP

Nick Cearley during a performance of "A Midsummer Night’s Dream," in New York.The actor-musician stars as the wise-guy sprite, Puck, in a more imaginative version of Shakespeare’s masterpiece that runs a little shorter, includes some razzle-dazzle, and adds music played by Cearley on ukulele and other instruments.Russ Rowland/Joe Trentacosta PR via AP

Nick Cearley during a performance of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” in New York.The actor-musician stars as the wise-guy sprite, Puck, in a more imaginative version of Shakespeare’s masterpiece that runs a little shorter, includes some razzle-dazzle, and adds music played by Cearley on ukulele and other instruments.

NEW YORK — It seems like every summer there’s a production of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” but Nick Cearley feels the one he’s starring in nicely compliments LGBT pride month.

“I think that the relationship between Puck and Oberon has some gay undertones, overtones, whatever you want to call them, so I think it lends itself perfectly,” Cearley said.

The out actor-musician stars as the wise-guy sprite Puck in a more imaginative version of Shakespeare’s masterpiece that runs a little shorter, includes some razzle-dazzle and adds music played by Cearley on ukulele and other instruments.

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“This is a very musical Puck,” Cearley said.

The show runs through the end of the month at the 47th Street Theatre in New York, but Cearley has a busy year ahead of him.

He’ll be on the road playing Alex Moore in the one-man show “Buyer & Cellar” in between playing short tours with his band, The Skivvies. The playful duo, which includes his “partner in crime” Lauren Molina, creatively plays a wide range of music “stripped down.” They are often joined by elite Broadway stars, who also must perform in their underwear or some other creative type of undergarment.

Cearley spoke to The Associated Press about the band’s growing fan base, LGBT pride and playing a Shakespearean character.

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