Top Mormon leaders vow to be leading advocates for marriage exclusive to a man and a woman

President Thomas S. Monson of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, center, is flanked by President Henry B. Eyring, First Counselor in the First Presidency, left, and Dieter F. Uchtdorf, Second Counselor in the First Presidency during opening session of the two-day Mormon church conference Saturday, April 4, 2015, in Salt Lake City.

President Thomas S. Monson of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, center, is flanked by President Henry B. Eyring, First Counselor in the First Presidency, left, and Dieter F. Uchtdorf, Second Counselor in the First Presidency during opening session of the two-day Mormon church conference Saturday, April 4, 2015, in Salt Lake City. Rick Bowmer, AP

President Thomas S. Monson of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, center, is flanked by President Henry B. Eyring, First Counselor in the First Presidency, left, and Dieter F. Uchtdorf, Second Counselor in the First Presidency during opening session of the two-day Mormon church conference Saturday, April 4, 2015, in Salt Lake City. Rick Bowmer, AP

President Thomas S. Monson of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, center, is flanked by President Henry B. Eyring, First Counselor in the First Presidency, left, and Dieter F. Uchtdorf, Second Counselor in the First Presidency during opening session of the two-day Mormon church conference Saturday, April 4, 2015, in Salt Lake City.

SALT LAKE CITY — Mormon leaders vowed to be a leading advocate for the belief that marriage is an institution exclusive to a man and a woman during the religion‘s biannual conference in Salt Lake City this weekend.

More than 100,000 Mormons descended on Salt Lake City for the faith’s biannual conference to listen to spiritual guidance from leaders and to learn about church news.

L. Tom Perry, a member of the faith’s Quorum of the Twelve, cautioned Mormons not to be swayed by a world filled with media and entertainment that presents the minority masquerading as the majority and tries to make mainstream values seem obsolete.

Perry said strong, traditional families are the basic units of a stable society, a stable economy and a stable culture of values. He noted that Mormons investment in the topic is even deeper than other religions because they believe marriages and family are for eternity.

“We want our voice to be heard against all of the counterfeit and alternative lifestyles that try to replace the family organization that God Himself established,” Perry said.

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D. Todd Christofferson, another member of the quorum, added more on the topic, saying, “A family built on the marriage of a man and woman supplies the best setting for God’s plan to thrive – the setting for the birth of children who come in purity and innocence from God.”

Christofferson said the focus on marriage isn’t meant to disparage those who don’t marry, be it because they can’t find a suitable partner, have physical or mental impairments or experience same-sex attraction.

“No one is predestined to receive less than all that the Father has for His children,” Christofferson said.

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