New & Noteworthy:

Follow breaking news @lgbtqnation
Asia

Kyrgyzstan to consider anti-gay law similar to Russia’s gay ‘propaganda’ ban

Saturday, March 29, 2014
0

The Central Asian country of Kyrgyzstan is considering an anti-gay law that would prohibit its citizens from creating “a positive attitude toward non-traditional sexual relations” among minors, a bill nearly identical to Russia’s anti-gay propaganda law.

KyrgyzstanThe bill would amend the nation’s criminal code, the Code of Administrative Responsibility, the Law on Peaceful Assembly, and the Law on Mass Media, and would introduce a range of criminal and administrative sanctions on those who speak or act in a manner which promote homosexuality.

Under proposed amendments to the Criminal Code, violators would face up to six months in prison and a fine of from 2,000 to 5,000 KGS ($36 to $91 USD). For repeat offenders, the prison term could be as long as a year and the fine would be 3,000 to 6,000 KGS ($55 to $110 USD).

Fines also could be imposed under the administrative code for similar activities that do not amount to criminal acts under the proposed amendments.

Sponsors define “non-traditional sexual relations” as “sodomy, lesbianism and other forms of non-traditional sexual behavior.”

They claim that the amendments are necessary “to safeguard and protect the traditional family, human, moral, and historical values of Kyrgyz society.”

“This draconian bill is blatantly discriminatory against LGBT people and would deny citizens across Kyrgyzstan their fundamental rights,” said Hugh Williamson, a spokesman for Human Rights Watch in New York. “The sponsors of this homophobic bill should withdraw it immediately, and the government and political parties should speak out against such legislation, making clear it has no place in Kyrgyzstan.”

The law, which was published online Wednesday for public discussion, has not been officially registered for consideration by parliament.

Share this article with your friends and followers:

Explore Archives: , , ,

Recommended reading
Comments