Pentagon surveying service members on repeal of ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’


LGBTQ Nation

The Pentagon on Wednesday began sending 400,000 surveys to U.S. service members asking their opinion about what impact the repeal of the “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” might have on morale and readiness, and their willingness to share quarters with gay or lesbian service members.

The survey of more than 100 questions is being sent to 200,000 active duty troops and 200,000 reserve troops, all selected at random.

According to CNN:

The survey, which service members can expect to receive via e-mail, asks about such issues as how unit morale or readiness might be affected if a commander is believed to be gay or lesbian; the need to maintain personal standards of conduct; and how repeal might affect willingness to serve in the military.

The survey also asks a number of questions aimed at identifying problems that could occur when troops live and work in close quarters in overseas war zones. For example, the questionnaire asks military members how they would react if they had to share a room, bathrooms, and open-bay showers in a war zone with other service members believed to be gay or lesbian.

The survey also seeks opinions on whether or not “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,” the military ban on openly gay service members, should be repealed.

Although the identity of all those who respond is expected to remain confidential, there is a link within the survey specifically for gay or lesbian service members who wish to provide additional comment without fear of being singled out and separated from the service as required by the existing law.

A similar survey will be sent to the family members of service members around the first week in August.

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