Marriage equality fight turns to clerks, probate judges who refuse licenses to same-sex couples

(Continued from Page 2)

Joe Odicta waves at cars honking in support of the protest of Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis at the Rowan County Judicial Center, Tuesday, June 30, 2015, in Morehead, Ky.Timothy D. Easley, AP

Joe Odicta waves at cars honking in support of the protest of Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis at the Rowan County Judicial Center, Tuesday, June 30, 2015, in Morehead, Ky.

[ Previous ]

Even in Mississippi, Texas and Louisiana, where governors took the most vigorous stands against Friday’s Supreme Court’s ruling, clerks were issuing licenses.

But in Kentucky, Kim Davis stayed firm in denying one Tuesday to April Miller and Karen Roberts, a couple of 11 years who live in Morehead.

The office of Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway encouraged any couples who are turned away to seek private counsel. Miller and Roberts contacted the American Civil Liberties Union of Kentucky to represent them.

“This is where we live; we pay taxes here, we vote here. And we want to get married here,” said Miller.

Outside Kim Davis’ office, drivers honked and waved, flew rainbow flags from their windows and shouted “love must win!”

Article continues below

But a small group also gathered to support Davis, demonstrating the stark divide that remains in the most theologically conservative stretches of the South and Midwest, where state leaders fought hard for years to prevent same-sex marriage.

“Our country is on the wrong path. We as a people no longer exalt God,” said Dennis Buschman, who carried a Bible as he led a half-dozen people supporting the clerk’s defiance. He called homosexuality an “abomination” and a “serious, serious sin.”

Some protesters confronted them.

“God did not elect her, I did,” said Kevin Bass, a former police officer who arrived at the courthouse with his wife to support gay couples seeking licenses. “If she objects to doing her job, she can go.”

© 2015, Associated Press, All Rights Reserved.
This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

This Story Filed Under

Comments