AP-GfK Poll: Support for same-sex marriage comes with caveats

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission unanimously ruled on Thursday that sexual orientation discrimination is already illegal under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Danny Johnston, AP

A gay rights advocate waves a rainbow pride flag at at an Arkansas rally of gay marriage opponents in Little Rock on Nov. 19, 2014.Danny Johnston, AP

A gay rights advocate waves a rainbow pride flag at at an Arkansas rally of gay marriage opponents in Little Rock on Nov. 19, 2014.

While finding that Americans narrowly favor allowing gay and lesbian couples to legally marry, a new Associated Press-GfK poll also shows most believe wedding-related businesses should be allowed to deny service to same-sex couples for religious reasons.

Roughly half the country also thinks local officials and judges with religious objections ought to be exempt from any requirement that they issue marriage licenses to gay and lesbian couples, according to the poll.

GAY-MARRIAGE-POLL_Nati

That view of the same-sex marriage issue echoes that of the Mormon church. Last week, the church called on state legislatures to pass new laws that protect gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people from discrimination but also to protect the rights of those who assert their religious beliefs.

David Kenney, a self-employed Catholic from Novi, Michigan, said he’s fine with same-sex marriage being legal. He’s among the 57 percent of Americans who said wedding-related businesses – such as florists – should be allowed to refuse service if they have an objection rooted in their religion.

“Why make an issue out of one florist when there are probably thousands of florists?” asked Kenney, 59. “The gay community wants people to understand their position, but at the same time, they don’t want to understand other people’s religious convictions. It’s a two-way street.”

Kenney isn’t alone. About a quarter of those who favor legal same-sex marriage also favor religious exemptions for those who issue marriage licenses, the poll finds, and a third say wedding-related businesses should be allowed to refuse service.

Article continues below

Geri Rice, who lives near San Francisco and works in law firm management, strongly favors gay marriage. She’s torn about whether a public official with religious objections should be exempt from issuing a license but says she believes that business owners should be allowed to tell somebody no thanks.

“I don’t like it,” Rice said, “but I think they have the right.”

Whether a business can refuse service to someone is a matter of federal, state and local law. National gay-rights groups called the idea of trying to carve out religious exemptions in anti-discrimination statues, such as those proposed by leaders of the Mormon church, deeply flawed.

Continue reading

This Story Filed Under

Comments