North Carolina

As deadline approaches, reversal unlikely on North Carolina law

FILE- In this Feb. 20, 2016, file photo, North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory speaks with reporters following the opening session of the National Governors Association Winter Meeting in Washington. McCrory and Democratic challenger Roy Cooper are tapping into emotions about a new North Carolina law getting national attention to raise money in their high-stakes gubernatorial race this fall.

FILE- In this Feb. 20, 2016, file photo, North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory speaks with reporters following the opening session of the National Governors Association Winter Meeting in Washington. McCrory and Democratic challenger Roy Cooper are tapping into emotions about a new North Carolina law getting national attention to raise money in their high-stakes gubernatorial race this fall. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File)

RALEIGH, N.C. — North Carolina government and university officials were given until Monday to tell federal attorneys whether they would stop enforcing a new law blocking LGBT protections, particularly provisions requiring transgender people to use public restrooms that correspond to their biological sex.

Republican Gov. Pat McCrory said Sunday he will decide how to respond to the U.S. Justice Department by the deadline but sounds little interested in capitulating to the agency. Government attorneys contend the law approved by the state Legislature in March violates the federal Civil Rights Act.

The Justice Department is “trying to define gender identity, and there is no clear identification or definition of gender identify,” McCrory said on “Fox News Sunday.”

McCrory said he was not aware of any North Carolina cases of transgender people using their gender identity to access a restroom and molest someone, a fear frequently cited by the law’s supporters as the main reason for its passage.

The governor said there was no comparison between civil rights laws that forbid racial discrimination and the Justice Department’s claim that the federal law also protects transgender people.

“We can definitely define the race of people. It’s very hard to define transgender or gender identity,” McCrory said, adding his request for more time to respond to the Justice Department was denied.

McCrory has called the law is a common-sense measure designed to protect the privacy of people who use bathrooms and locker rooms and expect all people inside the facilities to be of the same gender. The governor has become the public face of the law called House Bill 2, which has been the subject of intense criticism by gay rights groups, corporate executives and entertainers who demand the law be repealed.

DOJ last week demanded McCrory, University of North Carolina leaders and the state’s public safety agency to respond by Monday whether they intended to stop enforcing the law. Repealing the law also would satisfy the attorneys, but GOP lawmakers who run the General Assembly had no plans before to do so by the deadline. The legislature scheduled no recorded votes or substantive action during Monday’s House and Senate sessions.

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