Primary results: Clinton wins by losing and Trump scores 3 big wins

A man stands in the doorway to cool down at Precinct 15 in Flint, Mich., during the primary election on Tuesday March 7, 2016.  Presidential candidates in both parties were looking to Michigan on Tuesday for one of the largest delegate hauls in the bruising nominating contests.

A man stands in the doorway to cool down at Precinct 15 in Flint, Mich., during the primary election on Tuesday March 7, 2016. Presidential candidates in both parties were looking to Michigan on Tuesday for one of the largest delegate hauls in the bruising nominating contests. (Ryan Garza/Detroit Free Press via AP)

WASHINGTON (AP) — Donald Trump is spoiling for the big fight ahead, especially in Florida, now that he’s fresh off victories in the industrial Midwest, the South and Hawaii. Hillary Clinton has pushed over the halfway mark in delegates needed for the Democratic presidential nomination, showing she can win even by losing.

A late-night cliffhanger in Michigan ended in Bernie Sanders’ favor, giving him bragging rights to a big race Clinton was expected to win. She progressed regardless, thanks to an earlier victory in Mississippi on Tuesday night and a close split of delegates shared with Sanders in Michigan.

Trump took Mississippi, Michigan and Hawaii while yielding to Cruz in Idaho.

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BIG ONES AHEAD

Florida and Ohio are coming up next Tuesday, and they are crucial for Republicans.

The Republican contests will be winner-take-all for the first time. Trump is itching to take out Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, with whom he’s had a venomous feud, and a Florida victory would accomplish that. He’s bidding for Ohio, too, hoping to dispense with its governor, John Kasich, and turn the wild GOP contest into a head-to-head battle with Ted Cruz.

Trump looks strong in both states. Illinois, Missouri and North Carolina Republicans also vote.

Democrats vote next week in the same five states. In all 691 delegates will be at stake. The Democratic delegates will be allocated in proportion to the vote.

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ILL TRADE WINDS

More than half of Democratic and Republican voters in Michigan, along with Republicans in Mississippi, said trade takes away jobs, according to surveys of voters after they cast ballots. In Mississippi, Democratic primary voters were more closely divided, with 4 in 10 saying it takes away jobs and nearly as many thinking it has a positive impact.

Exit polling also found Clinton in Mississippi was supported over Sanders by 9 in 10 black voters, who accounted for nearly two-thirds of Democratic primary voters in the state.

That was yet another stark example of Sanders struggling with black voters.

And Michigan, like previous races, pointed to an age divide for Democrats, with Clinton prevailing with people 45 and older and Sanders leading among those younger than 45.

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