LGBTQ Life

Homophobic parents compare LGBTQ student group to ISIS

“If we do not band together and stop this B.S, the next thing you know, we will have F.I.M.A. (future ISIS members of America) ‪#‎PUTGODINSCHOOLSPLEASE‬

“If we do not band together and stop this B.S, the next thing you know, we will have F.I.M.A. (future ISIS members of America) ‪#‎PUTGODINSCHOOLSPLEASE‬

Testy homophobic parents participated in a rally this week at a Tennessee high school, extremely upset about a school club dedicated to LGBTQ students.

The Franklin County High School Gay Straight Alliance (GSA) is a new club that’s generated controversy since its formation.

Now, upset parents have remembered they have computers at home: They’ve launched a Facebook page encouraging members to “stand against” the club.

John Wimley and Chris Ball assert the group is the first step towards having a terrorist Islamic State on campus.

They’ve also printed fliers to spread the word.

“If we do not band together and stop this B.S, the next thing you know, we will have F.I.M.A. (future ISIS members of America) ‪#‎PUTGODINSCHOOLSPLEASE‬,” Wimley writes.

At a school board meeting earlier in the week, resident Robert Widelick went to town on a microphone, frothing at the mouth about how he doubted the group’s agenda, and insisting the group wants to thrust “the gay agenda” on anyone who attends the meetings.

Acording to Widelick, “There’s really no place for discussion of sexual orientation in a public high school.”

Kevin Hamrick, a student who’s a member of the GSA, shared why he thinks the group is necessary.

“Our community demeans the LGBT community so much that there has to be something to stop it,” he said on Monday evening. “You can take us down. You can take our signs down. You can take the tears out of our eyes. But we still have a legal right to keep meeting.”

Some students have been wearing “straight pride” shirts in opposition.

The New Civil Rights Movement reports the club has had many of its posters and fliers torn down and defaced.

“We all have common troubles,” student Allie Faxon told the Tennessean. “By having the club, even people who aren’t out can come and have a place to be themselves.”

Following Monday’s meeting, the school board has made the decision to review policies for all the school clubs, though GSA Club can continue to meet in the meantime.

h/t: Pink News

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