Kim Davis reflects on her role in same-sex marriage debate

Kim Davis

Kim Davis AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley, File

FRANKFORT, Ky. — Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis, who spent five days in jail for refusing to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples, said she prayed for those who disagreed with her and feels the pace of social change has “awakened” Christians across the country.

In an interview with The Associated Press about her year at the center of one of the biggest social changes in decades, Davis described it as “a very emotional and a very real situation to all people.” But she said simply telling others about her faith was not “going to make anybody believe anything.” And so she put her faith in action by refusing to issue the licenses.

“No one would ever have remembered a county clerk that just said … ‘Even though I don’t agree with it, it’s OK. I’ll do it,'” Davis said. “If I could be remembered for one thing, it’s that I was not afraid to not compromise myself.”

Davis spoke with The Associated Press on Tuesday morning. By that afternoon, Kentucky Republican Gov. Matt Bevin had issued an executive order removing the names of county clerks from marriage licenses — which Davis’ lawyer described as a Christmas gift. The issue was one of the most prominent disagreements between Bevin and Democratic nominee Jack Conway in the November election.

Bevin spoke at a rally at the Graves County Detention Center on the day Davis was released from jail. But Davis said she did not think her actions handed the election to Bevin by galvanizing conservative voters across the state.

“I think he truly won on his own merit,” Davis said. “I wouldn’t take anything away from him.”

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