British lawmakers: Don’t ban poppers

A report by the Commons Home Affairs Select Committee on the forthcoming Psychoactive Substances Bill suggests poppers be removed from the list.

A report by the Commons Home Affairs Select Committee on the forthcoming Psychoactive Substances Bill suggests poppers be removed from the list.

A report by the Commons Home Affairs Select Committee on the forthcoming Psychoactive Substances Bill suggests poppers be removed from the list.

A report by the Commons Home Affairs Select Committee on the forthcoming Psychoactive Substances Bill suggests poppers be removed from the list.

British lawmakers have come forward and asked that poppers not be banned as part of the government’s crusade against “legal highs.”

Right now, legislation is passing through parliament that requests banning the production, distribution, sale, and supply of all “designer drugs,” and sellers can jailed for up to seven years.

Poppers (aka amyl nitrates) have been included in these new laws.

The committee that’s examining the bill has claimed that poppers are:

“not seen to be capable of having harmful effects sufficient to constitute a societal problem. Therefore we recommend they should not be banned. If in the future there is any evidence produced to the contrary, then ‘poppers’ should be removed from the exempted list or controlled under the Misuse of Drugs Act.”

Other drugs included under the ‘legal highs’ banner are laughing gas, salvia, and vanilla sky.

Mike Penning, the policing minister, told the Huffington Post that these new laws will “fundamentally change the way we tackle new psychoactive substances. It will put an end to the game of cat and mouse in which new drugs appear on the market more quickly than Government can identify and ban them.”

This Story Filed Under

Comments