Gay man writes his family to tell them he’s engaged; receives hateful reply from dad

The change would prevent probate judges who oppose same-sex marriage from having to sign licenses for gay couples.

The change would prevent probate judges who oppose same-sex marriage from having to sign licenses for gay couples.

"Three years ago," he writes, "I met someone who took my breath away..."

“Three years ago,” he writes, “I met someone who took my breath away…”

The New Civil Rights Movement reports that a gay man, who was rejected by his Christian family when he came out, gave them a second chance when he became engaged to his boyfriend.

As first reported by Gay Star News, the man (who calls himself B.G.) wrote the following letter to his parents three years after their estrangement, hoping that time had healed the wounds:

“I hope this letter finds you well. I love you and miss you dearly. I am writing this letter to tell you about what has happened over the last three years.

“Three years ago I came out to you as gay. This was not out of rebellion, malice, or because of the influence of some carnal world. This was the result of years of careful introspection about my life, my feelings, and my happiness. I knew that the result of my coming out would cause a deep and lasting division between myself and my family, which I deeply regret, but I absolutely do not regret my decision to come out to you. I know that nothing I can say will change your minds about this, so I won’t try. Instead I would like to share with you the happiness that I have found.

“Three years ago, I met someone who took my breath away. This person was incredibly kind, caring, handsome, and smart. We hung out together with friends for several months, and our friendship grew closer until we were talking to each other every day. We started dating, and I realized that there was something extraordinarily special about this person. I was becoming a better, stronger person as we grew closer. We moved in together one year after we met. Every day, our bond grew stronger. Together we learned how to complement our strengths and weaknesses, and we fell deeper in love. We shared amazing adventures as another year went by. We traveled, found jobs, met and reconnected with family; we grew together as a couple. It didn’t take much longer to realize there was no other person I would rather spend the rest of my life with. A few months ago, B. K. asked me to marry him; I said yes, and ever since, I have been so filled with joy, that I cannot stop smiling.

“I do not expect you to approve of my relationship with B. I do not expect you to come to our wedding next year. Maybe someday you would be willing to meet him and reconnect our families, but until then I hope you can wish us happiness and prosperity knowing that when I am with B, I am the best and happiest person I’ve ever been.

With Love,
B.G.”

The father responded:

“What do you plan on doing about your name… ? My name was NEVER to be given to another man. Only to a Godly female as your wife. You are the last “G” male and I will NOT have my name associated with this “marriage”. I do not want it hyphenated with another man’s name either. Just remove it entirely and let my legacy die with me.”

Writing on Reddit about the exchange, B.G posted the following message:

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