In Alabama, some counties issue same-sex marriage licenses while others still refuse

Jessica Dent, right, puts a ring on Carolee Taylor during their wedding ceremony officiated by Paul Hard after getting a marriage license at the Montgomery County Courthouse on Friday, June 26, 2015 in Montgomery, Ala.

Jessica Dent, right, puts a ring on Carolee Taylor during their wedding ceremony officiated by Paul Hard after getting a marriage license at the Montgomery County Courthouse on Friday, June 26, 2015 in Montgomery, Ala. Albert Cesare, The Montgomery Advertiser via AP

Jessica Dent, right, puts a ring on Carolee Taylor during their wedding ceremony officiated by Paul Hard after getting a marriage license at the Montgomery County Courthouse on Friday, June 26, 2015 in Montgomery, Ala. Albert Cesare, The Montgomery Advertiser via AP

Jessica Dent, right, puts a ring on Carolee Taylor during their wedding ceremony officiated by Paul Hard after getting a marriage license at the Montgomery County Courthouse on Friday, June 26, 2015 in Montgomery, Ala.

MONTGOMERY, Ala. — Nearly one-third of Alabama counties on Monday were not issuing marriage licenses to gay couples, or had shut down marriage license operations altogether, despite Friday’s landmark U.S Supreme Court ruling that same-sex couples have a fundamental right to marry.

An Associated Press telephone survey of counties on Monday found that at least 32 of the state’s 67 counties were issuing the licenses to gay couples. However, at least 22 counties were not issuing the licenses, with many of those shutting down marriage license operations altogether as probate judges said they needed time to sort out the ruling.

Rep. Patricia Todd, the state’s only openly gay lawmaker and the head of the Human Rights Campaign-Alabama, said the probate judges needed to accept that the issue was settled with the U.S Supreme Court ruling that made gay marriage the law of the land.

“It’s perplexing to me that they are not able to do their job,” Todd said. “Unfortunately, I think it’s probably going to continue until one gets sued and thousands of taxpayer dollars are spent on a lawsuit they are going to lose.”

In March, in response to a request from two conservative groups, the Alabama Supreme Court ordered probate judges not to issue licenses to gay couples. On Monday, the court issued an order that noted a 25-day rehearing period for the landmark marriage ruling and asked the judges and the conservative groups to file motions “addressing the effect of the Supreme Court’s decision” on the March injunction by July 6.

Article continues below

At least two probate judges pointed to the order from the state’s highest court to explain why they were not issuing same-sex marriage licenses.

Randolph County Probate Judge George Diamond said he is waiting for the end of a 25-day appeal period before he begins issuing same-sex marriage licenses. Diamond said the county could begin sooner if it receives a directive from the state’s high court.

“Right now my attorneys are telling us to hold off and see what this appeal is,” he said.

Marion County Probate Judge Rocky Ridings said the county is not issuing same-sex marriage licenses after receiving the Alabama Supreme Court’s order.

Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore, who recused himself from the Alabama marriage case because of his past statements, did not participate in Monday’s order. He did issue a separate statement, however, saying that “in no way does the order instruct probate judges of this State as to whether or not they should comply with the U.S. Supreme Court‘s ruling.”

Continue reading

This Story Filed Under

Comments