Same-sex marriage ruling leads to immediate vows in Michigan

Jayne Rowse, left, and her partner April DeBoer celebrate in Ann Arbor, Mich., following a ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court that struck down bans on same sex marriage nationwide Friday, June 26, 2015. A judge who overturned Michigan's ban on gay marriage says he's willing to officiate at the marriage of the two Detroit-area nurses at the center of the groundbreaking case.

Jayne Rowse, left, and her partner April DeBoer celebrate in Ann Arbor, Mich., following a ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court that struck down bans on same sex marriage nationwide Friday, June 26, 2015. A judge who overturned Michigan's ban on gay marriage says he's willing to officiate at the marriage of the two Detroit-area nurses at the center of the groundbreaking case. Paul Sancya, AP

Jayne Rowse, left, and her partner April DeBoer celebrate in Ann Arbor, Mich., following a ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court that struck down bans on same sex marriage nationwide Friday, June 26, 2015. A judge who overturned Michigan's ban on gay marriage says he's willing to officiate at the marriage of the two Detroit-area nurses at the center of the groundbreaking case.Paul Sancya, AP

Jayne Rowse, left, and her partner April DeBoer celebrate in Ann Arbor, Mich., following a ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court that struck down bans on same sex marriage nationwide Friday, June 26, 2015. A judge who overturned Michigan‘s ban on gay marriage says he’s willing to officiate at the marriage of the two Detroit-area nurses at the center of the groundbreaking case.

Updated: 6:00 p.m. EDT

DETROIT — Many Michigan gay couples quickly married Friday after the U.S. Supreme Court legalized gay marriage in a case involving two Detroit-area nurses who said they were elated “that this day has finally come.”

A judge last year said Michigan’s 2004 ban on gay marriage was unconstitutional, and the nation’s highest court agreed. Gov. Rick Snyder pledged to comply with the ruling and urged Michigan residents to embrace the state’s diversity by treating everyone with respect.

Flanked by their attorneys, Jayne Rowse and April DeBoer of Hazel Park said they were “overwhelmed” by the “surreal” moment.

“We’ve done everything we could to protect our children, and to make sure families like ours have the same safety and security as all other families, and we couldn’t be more thrilled that this day has finally come,” DeBoer said in Ann Arbor, where they gathered with their lawyers and supporters.

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They have each adopted two children but hadn’t been able to jointly adopt them because it was tied in Michigan to heterosexual marriage. That will change with the Supreme Court decision.

“Our state government will follow the law and our state agencies will make the necessary changes to ensure that we will fully comply. … With this matter now settled, as Michiganders we should move forward positively, embracing our state’s diversity and striving to treat everyone with the respect and dignity they deserve,” said Snyder, a Republican.

DeBoer, 44, and Rowse, 50, plan to have U.S. District Judge Bernard Friedman marry them in late summer or early fall. He’s the judge who overturned the state’s gay marriage ban in 2014, a decision that eventually landed at the Supreme Court.

“It seems very right to have him be the one to perform the ceremony,” DeBoer told The Associated Press.

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