Texas lawmakers attempt to revive religious objections bill

Texas

Texas state capitol in Austin.

Texas state capitol in Austin.

Updated: 2:50 p.m. CDT

AUSTIN, Texas — Texas got a taste Monday of the religious objections issue that drew strong criticism elsewhere, with many church leaders imploring state lawmakers to protect religious freedoms in the name of tolerance but others taking the opportunity to openly decry gay marriage.

Top Republicans in the Texas Legislature have made a late attempt to revive a bill excusing clergy from presiding over marriages that violate their beliefs. The measure isn’t particularly divisive, even winning endorsements from civil liberty groups that say it largely restates existing law, and that they agree churches should be allowed to set their own religious policies.

But Sen. Craig Estes’ proposal follows arguments over gay marriage before the U.S. Supreme Court, as well as broader religious objections bills in Indiana and Arkansas that made national headlines after opponents said they would sanction discrimination against gay people.

“It’s a tricky situation here, but I just think that ministers must be able to follow the dictates of their conscience and their theological system that they belong to,” Estes, a Wichita Falls Republican, told a Senate committee hearing his bill Monday.

More than a dozen pastors and religious elders – many heading Southern Baptist congregations – lined up to support the bill before the committee, saying that they don’t condone bigotry but do believe clergy members shouldn’t be sued if they adhere to their religious beliefs and refuse to officiate certain weddings.

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Others, though, used the public forum to voice their concerns about gay marriage. David Joiner, pastor at Life Springs Christian Church in Liberty Hill, northwest of Austin, said same-sex couples being allowed to wed “offends God” and suggested it could be a stepping stone toward allowing pedophilia.

“It violates natural law,” Joiner said. “It validates and promotes the homosexual lifestyle. It turns a moral wrong into a civil right.”

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