North Carolina AG says he’d veto religious exemption bills if governor

Attorney General Roy Cooper (R-N.C.)

Attorney General Roy Cooper (R-N.C.)

Attorney General Roy Cooper (R-N.C.)

Attorney General Roy Cooper (R-N.C.)

RALEIGH, N.C. — North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper says he rejects a proposal allowing public officials to cite religion for declining to serve same-sex couples.

Cooper is preparing a run for governor in 2016 and spoke Wednesday to The Associated Press.

He says if he was governor he’d veto two Republican legislative proposals related to same-sex marriage.

One would allow magistrates and court officials to refuse to carry out civil same-sex marriages due to religious beliefs.

Supporters say the other measure protects businesses from government interference, which is similar Indiana‘s religious freedom law that sparked furor.

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Last week, GOP Gov. Pat McCrory said he isn’t backing the bills either.

Republicans currently hold veto-proof majorities in the House and Senate, meaning they could choose to override a governor’s objections if GOP lawmakers remain together.

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