AP-GfK Poll: Nuanced views on LGBT rights, religious liberty

Joe Capley-Alfano, center, and his husband, Frank Capley-Alfano, who've been together 15 years and married seven, hold an American flag in front of the Supreme Court in Washington, Tuesday, April 28, 2015 while opponents demonstrate nearby.

Joe Capley-Alfano, center, and his husband, Frank Capley-Alfano, who've been together 15 years and married seven, hold an American flag in front of the Supreme Court in Washington, Tuesday, April 28, 2015 while opponents demonstrate nearby. Cliff Owen, AP

Joe Capley-Alfano, center, and his husband, Frank Capley-Alfano, who've been together 15 years and married seven, hold an American flag in front of the Supreme Court in Washington, Tuesday, April 28, 2015 while opponents demonstrate nearby.Cliff Owen, AP

Joe Capley-Alfano, center, and his husband, Frank Capley-Alfano, who’ve been together 15 years and married seven, hold an American flag in front of the Supreme Court in Washington, Tuesday, April 28, 2015 while opponents demonstrate nearby.

WASHINGTON — Most Americans think the government should protect religious liberties over gay rights when the two come into conflict, a new Associated Press-GfK poll finds, though fewer think most businesses should be allowed to turn away gay couples because of religious beliefs.

The survey uncovered nuanced views on gay rights as the Supreme Court considers, in a case heard this week, whether the Constitution gives same-sex couples the right to marry.

Americans are more likely to say that religious liberties are more important for the government to protect than the rights of gays and lesbians, by a 56 percent to 40 percent margin, the poll found. Just a quarter of Americans call gay rights a very or extremely important issue to them personally, while half call religious liberties a very or extremely important issue.

But fewer Americans – just 40 percent – think most business owners should be allowed to refuse service to gays and lesbians on religious grounds. That finding goes to the heart of the significant political fallout over Indiana‘s Religious Freedom Restoration Act, which critics charged was intended to allow businesses discriminate against gays and lesbians.

With public opinion apparently split, it’s an open question how gay rights will play in the 2016 campaign.

Rev. Samuel Rodriguez, president of the National Hispanic Leadership Conference, said Republicans would be wise to make religious freedom a central issue because the broad debate highlights intolerance against Christians.

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“Religious freedom will emerge as a centerpiece, and Democrats will have an impossible time defending against it,” said Rodriguez, whose organization aligns with conservative Republicans on this issue.

Others think the issue could be perilous for the GOP.

“Religious liberty works well with religious people, which is the GOP’s base, but the argument is easily turned on its head when the issue is discrimination against gay people,” said veteran Republican strategist John Feehery. “I think the GOP is better off talking about economic security and national security, while leaving this particular issue to the courts to decide.”

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