Poll: Ind. voters oppose amendment to ban recogniton of gay relationships


INDIANAPOLIS — Nearly two-thirds of Indiana voters do not support amending the state’s constitution to ban same-sex marriage or other forms of recognition for same-sex couples, according to a new poll released Tuesday by Freedom Indiana.

The poll, conducted by Bellwether Research, found that 64 percent of respondents oppose addressing same-sex marriage by amending the constitution, including 57 percent of Republicans and 54 percent of voters who identify as “very conservative.”

same-sex-marriage“The message from these results is clear: Hoosiers overwhelmingly support some legal recognition for same-sex couples, and they oppose amending the Indiana Constitution to address the issue of same-sex marriage and rights,” said Freedom Indiana campaign manager Megan Robertson.

Voters also indicated concerns about the second section of the amendment that calls for stripping protections from unmarried couples.

Of those polled, more than half of respondents would vote against HJR-6 after finding out that it bans civil unions and might have other consequences.

“Hoosiers do not want our Constitution amended, and we hope lawmakers will hear that message and make the right decision during the legislative session to either let this amendment die or vote it down,” Robertson said.

“We’re working every day to reach out across the state and let folks know that this amendment will rewrite our Constitution to remove protections for certain Hoosiers and send the wrong message about our state. This is the opposite of Hoosier hospitality.”

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Indiana is taking shape to be a marriage battleground in 2014.

State law currently prohibits same-sex marriage, and the General Assembly overwhelmingly supported the proposed constitutional amendment in 2011. If legislators approve it again next year, it would go before voters in November 2014.

Freedom Indiana is a statewide advocacy group formed to campaign against the amendment and is receiving money and public support from Indianapolis-based Eli Lilly and Co. and Columbus-based Cummins Inc.

Meanwhile, Advance America — a prominent conservative lobbying group — is pushing for Indiana lawmakers to disclose what side they’ll take in next year’s expected vote on the admendment.

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