Poll: Mich. voters support repealing state’s ban on same-sex marriage


LANSING, Mich. — A new poll finds that a majority of Michigan voters support repealing the state’s ban on same-sex marriage, and replacing it with an amendment to allow gay couples the freedom to marry.

According to the Glengariff Group poll released Wednesday, support for marriage equality in Michigan has increased to 56.8 percent, up 12.5 percentage points from last year, and reflects movement fueled largely by shifting public opinion from Republicans and independents.

The poll also found that 54 percent of voters support reversing Michigan’s 2004 constitutional ban on same-sex marriage, and implementing marriage rights for gay couples.

Support for marriage equality increased most among voters who identified themselves as independents, or said they lean Republican. The numbers didn’t change as much for other Republicans, but the results did indicate a divide between young GOP voters and those 40 years of age or older.

Geographically, Republicans in Southeast Michigan were more likely to support same-sex marriage than those in other parts of the state.

“This poll confirms Equality Michigan‘s assertion that fundamental fairness is not a partisan issue and Michigan voters are ready for real change in the treatment of LGBT people in Michigan,” said Emily Dievendorf, Managing Director of Equality Michigan, in a statement to LGBTQ Nation.

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“As more and more people become aware of the LGBT people in their lives and the evidence continues to mount that LGBT equality is good for Michigan’s economy, people are becoming bolder in their stance that the second-class treatment of LGBT people has been tolerated in Michigan for far too long,” said Dievendorf.

“There’s been a huge sea change in the last five years,” said Glengariff founder and CEO Richard Czuba. “I’ve never seen a policy issue move quite this much, quite this quickly.”

Czuba attributed the rapid shift to the fact that 83 percent of respondents said they knew a gay individual, “and history has shown that more people support issues if they know someone personally impacted.”

“That conflict is a huge challenge for the Republican Party,” Czuba said.

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