Follow breaking news @lgbtqnation
Minnesota

Chris Kluwe’s campaign for marriage equality: ‘This is an issue about freedom’

Monday, October 15, 2012

MINNEAPOLIS, Minn. — Minnesota Vikings’ punter Chris Kluwe, an outspoken advocate for marriage equality, appears in a new video for Minnesotans United for All Families, the official campaign working to defeat Minnesota’s proposed constitutional amendment banning same-sex marriage.

“It’s not the government’s job to tell us what to do. That’s not what America stands for,” says Kluwe. “At the end of the day, this is an issue about freedom… and treating other people the way that you would like to be treated.”

Watch:

Last month, Kluwe posted an open letter on the website Deadspin that he had sent to Maryland state lawmaker Emmett Burns, defending the opinions of Baltimore Ravens linebacker Brendon Ayanbadejo, and sharply criticizing Burns on his attempt to stifle Ayanbadejo’s free speech.

Ayanbadejo has also been a vocal supporter of same-sex marriage, and Burns had sent a letter demanding that the Ravens “inhibit such expressions” by their employee.

On October 1, Kluwe posted a letter in response to a video statement released by former Minnesota Viking Matt Birk, who said defending traditional marriage was “in line with God’s will.

Share this article with your friends and followers:

Archives: , ,

Filed under: Minnesota

7 more reader comments:

  1. Thank you!!

    Posted on Monday, October 15, 2012 at 6:26pm
  2. well said, mr. kluwe. *respect*

    Posted on Monday, October 15, 2012 at 7:20pm
  3. One thing that is truly interesting about the same-sex marriage issue is that there is no balance in solution focused reason.
    Analogy:
    My name is Elihu Eli El. If a group requests to use my name in order to create the Annual Elihu Eli El Community Block Party, I would ask for the agenda and likely give the group permission to use my name. The schedule of events could include the following, for example:
    Face painting
    Music
    Dancing
    Spoken Word, etc.

    If two years later, the same group decides to include a great outdoor food-fight to the Block Party that was named after me. I don’t support it, because massive food-fights waste food and money that could be used for the less fortunate. They have deviated from what I would approve. “Stop using my name for this event and change the name of your event”.

    Well, the institution of the church has allowed states to use the word “marriage” because the agenda received approval many years ago. Now that the states agenda has changed…the institution of the church is now saying – “Stop using my name for this event and change the name of your event”.

    In our case, “civil matrimony” should be declared for both sexual orientation and that is the common-sense solution.

    http://www.friendsofeli.com/live/video_popup.php/matrimony.doc?id=20&download=1&bipass=1&start_dl=1

    Posted on Monday, October 15, 2012 at 7:57pm
  4. Thank you Chris Kluwe! I wish others would stand up for equal rights.

    Posted on Monday, October 15, 2012 at 8:05pm
  5. Brighten up your Monday by watching a guy come out to strut around Seattle wearing a sign, politics can be fun!
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xQVhmBA0E8I&feature=plcp

    Be sure to watch it till the end and pass it on :)

    Posted on Monday, October 15, 2012 at 8:23pm
  6. Thank you SO MUch Chris Kluwe!

    Posted on Monday, October 15, 2012 at 9:10pm
  7. - Re above proposed ‘solution’ to the terminology issue: “Marriage” is colloquial and (as “civil marriage”) already in use, and therefore should be acknowledged as already extended in understanding. “Matrimony,” which is a Latin term primarily used to denote heterosexual marriage and its religiously-framed ceremonies, can feasibly be reserved for those who want a special term for exclusive one-man-one-woman marriage rites and agreements. But “marriage” itself, as a word and concept, cannot be assumed as exclusively a religious intellectual property – /nor/ replaced into exclusive connotation when it has already become both a commonsense term of reference (for centuries, actually) and a legal reality.

    Posted on Tuesday, October 16, 2012 at 12:15am