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South African man brutally murdered following argument over his sexuality


LGBTQ Nation

A South African gay man, who also identified as transgender, has been brutally murdered in an apparent hate crime after getting into an argument about his sexuality.

Initial reports indicated that the 23-year-old victim — Thapelo Makutle — was completely beheaded in the attack in Kuruman, Northern Cape, but according to police file documents, his throat was severely slit.

Further investigation has revealed that several of the media reports use the Facebook page of Shaine Griqua, director of the gay group LEGBO Northern Cape, as their sole source.

Thapelo Makutle

According to Griqua, Makutle was attacked and murdered on Friday (June 8) by two men for his sexuality and being transgender. Griqua claimed that, following a verbal argument, the two men apparently followed Makutle to the room he was renting, and slit his throat.

They then covered his body under a blanket as if he was sleeping. A female friend found Makutle the following Sunday morning.

A source in Cape Town informed Melanie Nathan that she had a conversation with the family of the deceased, who confirmed that his throat slit was severely slit, but he was not beheaded.

The source also received confirmation from the police.

Makutle, who identified as both gay and transgender, was a volunteer for gay group LEGBO.

Based in Northern Cape, LEGBO provides support and health training for rural LGBT communities confronted with stigmatization and victimization.

It is also believed that Makutle recently participated in the Kimberley Out In Africa Gay and Lesbian Festival, was a drag queen known as Queen Bling, and was recently crowned Miss Gay Kuruman.

Griqua wrote on his Facebook page that Makutle was a “well mannered and principled human being.”

“We are deeply hurt and saddened and pained by this… Just three weeks ago a lesbian was stabbed… at a night club.”

Griqua also noted that no arrests have been made in connection with the murder and expressed his concern about the increase of hate crimes in the province.

“Hate crime is widespread in the townships and beyond. It is inflamed by religious groups and ignorance about South Africa’s constitution,” said LGBT activist Junior Mayema from People Against Suffering Oppression and Poverty, a non-governmental organization based in Cape Town.

“In addition, the police have little or no training on hate crime which leads to many cases being either not investigated or ignored,” she said.

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