Report: Highest number of anti-LGBT murders recorded in 2011


A recent report by the National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs revealed that while reports of anti-LGBT hate crimes has decreased, 2011 accounted for the highest number of anti-LGBT murders since 1998, the year the NCAVP began tracking such attacks.

The increase in murders in 2011 suggests a continuing increase in the severity of violence facing the LGBTQH (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, and HIV-infected) communities, according to the NCAVP.

As found in previous years, hate violence continued to impact transgender people, people of color, and transgender people of color disproportionately. Data from 2011 also showed that young people under the age of 30 were more likely to experience hate violence.

Consistent with previous years, white gay non-transgender men represented the largest group of hate violence survivors and victims in 2011 showing that despite the disproportionate impact on transgender and people of color communities hate violence remains a pervasive and persistent issue for all LGBTQH people.

Among the study’s key findings, reports of anti-LGBTQH hate violence decreased by 16 percent from 2010, but anti-LGBTQH murders increased from 27 in 2010 to 30 in 2011, an 11 percent increase.

The NCAVP noted that young people were particularly more vulnerable to violence and may also represent the highest proportion of all survivors and victims in 2011 because they have less access to resources, experience family rejection, or family based homophobic, biphobic, and transphobic bias and violence. Their increased vulnerability can also result from, settings in which LGBTQH young people may be at greater risk for violence, such as school or the foster care system.

The complete NCAVP report can be downloaded here.

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