History in NY state – Almost 42 years after Stonewall, marriage equality passes


The Stonewall riots were a series of spontaneous, violent demonstrations against a police raid that took place in the early morning hours of June 28, 1969, at the Stonewall Inn, in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of New York City.

They are frequently cited as the first instance in American history when people in the homosexual community fought back against a government-sponsored system that persecuted sexual minorities, and they have become the defining event that marked the start of the gay rights movement in the United States and around the world.

Outside the Stonewall Inn, June 24, 2011 [Via: Scott Wooledge]

The last years of the 1960s were very contentious as many social movements were active, including the African American Civil Rights Movement, the Counterculture of the 1960s, and antiwar demonstrations. These influences served as catalysts for the Stonewall riots.

Very few establishments welcomed openly gay people in the 1950s and 1960s. Those that did were often bars, although bar owners and managers were rarely gay. The Stonewall Inn, at the time, was owned by the Mafia. It catered to an assortment of patrons, but it was known to be popular with the poorest and most marginalized people in the gay community.

Police raids on gay bars were routine in the 1960s, but officers quickly lost control of the situation at the Stonewall Inn, and attracted a crowd that was incited to riot.

After the Stonewall riots, gays and lesbians in New York City faced gender, class, and generational obstacles to becoming a cohesive community.

On June 28, 1970, the first Gay Pride marches took place in Los Angeles, Chicago, and New York commemorating the anniversary of the riots.

Gay Pride events are held annually throughout the world toward the end of June to mark the Stonewall riots.

Today, June 24, 2011, New York state gay and lesbian committed couples cross a great milestone to being equal citizens by being allowed to enjoy the rights of marriage.

“I’m not what I want to be,
I’m not what I’m gonna be,
But thank God I’m not what I was”

New Yorkers celebrate marriage equality.
Historical details via Wikipedia.

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