Archaeologists unearth skeleton of suspected ‘gay caveman’




Archaeologists have unearthed the skeleton of a late Stone Age man they believe — based on how he was buried — is the first known gay caveman.

The excavation in the Czech Republic, said to date back to between 2900 and 2500 BC, revealed a man buried in a way normally reserved only for women of the Corded Ware culture in the Copper Age.

During that period, men were traditionally buried lying on their right side with the head pointing towards the west; women on their left side with the head facing east.

In this case, the man was on his left side with his head facing west. Another clue is that men tended to be interred with weapons, hammers and flint knives as well as several portions of food and drink to accompany them to the other side.

Women would be buried with necklaces made from teeth, pets, and copper earrings, as well as domestic jugs and an egg-shaped pot placed near the feet.

The ‘gay caveman’ was buried with household jugs, and no weapons.

Archaeologists do not think it was a mistake or coincidence given the importance attached to funerals during the period, known as the Corded Ware era because of the pottery it produced.

“We believe this is one of the earliest cases of what could be described as a ‘transsexual’ or ‘third gender grave’ in the Czech Republic,” archaeologist Katerina Semradova told a press conference on Tuesday.

“From history and ethnology, we know that people from this period took funeral rites very seriously so it is highly unlikely that this positioning was a mistake,” said lead researcher Kamila Remisova Vesinova.

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